Thursday, 17 November 2016

Workshop - Dr. Richard Harvey

Psychoneuroimmunology Concepts Complement Biofeedback Basics
Richard Harvey, Ph.D.
1-day Workshop
28 April

Psychoneuroimmology is a term that implies the relationship between thoughts (the mind) and the immune system (the body).  This psychoneuroimmunology program presents plausible mechanisms explaining how psychological processes (attitudes, beliefs, cognitions and emotions) influence neuroendocrine and neuroimmune outcomes.  Advances in molecular biology and immunocytochemistry will be summarized to aid understanding the interconnections between psychological thought processes and physiological endocrine and immune processes.  Also covered are models describing how processes related to expectancy and conditioning may manifest in placebo (or nocebo) effects that strengthen or weaken neuroimmune responses, focusing on expectancy and conditioning strategies employed during a biofeedback training session.

Learning Objectives
  • Participants will describe the research data in basic psychoneuroimmunology.
  • Participants will identify the major components of the immune response to fight illness.
  • Participants will list beneficial biofeedback techniques or other supportive interventions that have been linked with improvements in immune function.
  
Profiling Stress and Courage
Richard Harvey, Ph.D
1-day Workshop
29 April

Profiling stress or, courage responses may be possible by distinguishing cardiovascular or other measurements (e.g. heart rate,  vasoconstriction or vasodilation, breathing) in reaction to tasks presented during a biofeedback protocol.  For example, visibly displaying a response to a profiling task not only brings insight for developing psychological attitudes of courage and resiliency, but also awareness of HOW MUCH physical overexertion of the cardiovascular system (or other systems) is occurring. This workshop explores step-by-step methods for distinguishing between various distressing (distress) and growth promoting (eustress) reactions.  Covered are theories related to the sequence of tasks used when profiling psychophysiological interactions, as well as practices ranging from sensor placement and rapport building to feedback techniques and interpretation of measurements.  All skill levels are welcome.

Learning Objectives
  • Participants will learn theory supporting the choice and sequence of tasks for running a stress profile protocol.
  • Participants will describe useful sensor placements for running a stress profile. 
  • Participants will identify skills for building rapport during a stress profile protocol.

About Dr. Richard Harvey
Richard Harvey, PhD is a faculty member of the Department of Health Education and Holistic Health at San Francisco State University.  Before joining the faculty at San Francisco State University, prior experience included working as an Epidemiologist in Orange County, California; as a University of California, Irvine Tobacco-Use Research Center Fellow; and, as a University of California, Irvine Counseling Center Biofeedback and Stress Management Program Director.  Research interests currently include developing holistic stress-reduction interventions that promote personal courage using biofeedback, and have included federally funded research related to tobacco use and cessation.  Professional association experience includes serving on the Board of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB) as the Treasurer and as President as well as on the Board of the Western Association of Biofeedback and Neuroscience -- formerly the Biofeedback Society of California-- in many roles including President.  Professional association presentations, workshops and invited keynote addresses have covered themes linking biofeedback  with other areas such as psychoneuroimmunology, ergonomics, resiliency and, stress profiling.

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